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You are our   Visitor

 

The May 21, 2019 Edition

of

The Newsleaf

 

Vol. 16  Issue 21

 

BETWEEN THE ISSUES

 

 2019 ACCHS High School

Graduation Photos

 

2019 Eighth Grade

Promotion Photos

 

 

FRONT PAGE

EIGHT GRADERS RECEIVE CERTIFICATE

Monday evening the 20th, the ACCJSHS held a promotion ceremony for this year’s eighth grade class.  The ceremony began with Addison Schletzbaum leading the crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance.  The class had selected one of the teaching staff, Corey Thomas, to address the students.  After his words of encouragement, Mr. Becker of the Becker-Dyer-Stanton Funeral Home presented the Compassionate Student Award to Rena Vessar.

Next order of business was to acknowledge those students that had achieved a perfect 4.0 GPA.  They were Kreyton Bauerle, Jordan Caplinger, Korin Kimmi, Natalie Nitz, Lillee Norris, Jenna Pitts, Emili Postma, Addison Schletzbaum and Aleah Wallisch. 

The KSHSAA Citizenship Awards were then presented to Kreyton Bauerle, and Aleah Wallisch.

 

The class was then presented to the crowd and they filed across the platform to shake hands with Mrs. Keith and receive their certificates.  A reception followed in the commons area where the graduates were greeted by friends and family and took many pictures.

 

 

HAWK HONORED BY COLLEAGUES

Representatives of the Northeast Kansas Ag Teachers district presented a plaque to Clifford Hawk, retired ag instructor from Highland Community College, for his 39 years of outstanding service on May 16.   Mr. Hawk has helped sponsor FFA contests on campus as well as articulation agreements with secondary schools as well as serving on advisory councils and being a resource.  Pictured from L-R are, Paul Lierz, Jackson Heights, Bob VanWinkle, Centralia High Schools; Chris Bauerle, Sabetha High School; and David Holiday, Rock Creek High School.   Mr. Hawk was taken out for a fun evening for dinner and the presentation.

 

THREE NEW BABIES IN MONROVIA

There are three new baby buffalos in the pasture west of the Monrovia Cemetery.  They are kind of cute considering what they will grow into.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TIME TO FILE FOR CITY POSITIONS

Anyone with an interest in serving on a school board or city government position, the deadline is approaching soon.  Effingham City office said they have been advised that NOON on June 3, 2019 is the last time to file for city council and mayor.  The filing fee is $20.00.

 

Click It. Or Ticket.

Law enforcement on the lookout for unrestrained drivers, passengers

TOPEKA, Kan. — Law enforcement agencies across Kansas will be taking a no-excuses approach to saving lives around this Memorial Day weekend. Tickets will be issued to unbuckled occupants as a harsh reminder of the importance of seatbelt use at all times.

More than 50 percent of traffic fatalities in Kansas in 2017 were unrestrained. Many of these individuals could have survived the car crash if they had only worn their seat belt. That’s why law enforcement across the state is stepping up enforcement with the Click It. Or Ticket. campaign that runs May 20 through June 2.

 “The Click it. Or Ticket. campaign isn’t about issuing citations, it’s about saving lives,” said Technical Trooper Ben Gardner, of the Kansas Highway Patrol. “Too many people die in motor vehicle crashes who could have survived if they had only buckled up.”

It is prohibited to drive or ride as a passenger in a motor vehicle without wearing a seat belt for a good reason. In 2017, 53 percent of the 316 deaths from automobile crashes in Kansas were not buckled. Pick-up truck drivers, young adults and males are among some of the worst offenders and most at-risk.

 “Frustratingly, there are still people out there who do not take that extra second to buckle up,” said Chris Bortz, KDOT Traffic Safety Program Manager. “Any adult not wearing their seat belt could be issued a $30 traffic citation. Make a better decision and buckle up, every trip, every time.”

In 2018,  Kansas observed seat belt usage was 84 percent, below the national average of 90 percent, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.  Education coupled with enforcement can raise this rate and ultimately save lives.

 

Science Fun Family Day to Explore Earth & Space and Man on the Moon in Atchison County’s Museum

Saturday, May 25th 10am – 3pm Science Fun Family Day

Leading up to this Summer’s 50th Anniversary of Man Landing on the Moon – the Science of Earth & Space is the topic of the 2nd Annual Science Fun Family Day in Atchison County’s Museum – Saturday May 25th, 2019.

Out of the Heritage of Atchison native Fritz Widick - who was part of the engineering team that put Man on the Moon in 1969 – visitors can make their own Stomp Rocket, learn about exploring the Moon, mapping activities on the Sun and Exploring the techniques NASA uses techniques to learn about Earth and Space. These core activities are the multiple experiment stations available for Families in Atchison County’s Museum on Saturday, May 26th from 10 am to 3 pm.

Exploring Earth and Space is a third grant from the National Informal STEM Education Network awarded to the Atchison County Historical Society to bring to the young people of Atchison County.

“From building your own stomp rocket, to learning how to study the Moon and the Sun or finding new planets with the same techniques NASA uses are all part of this fun set of experiments that will make you think a bit differently about our world,” said Chris Taylor, executive director of the Atchison County Historical Society. “Our changing world and our renewed view toward the Moon are just some of the topics the experiments explore. My favorite is the SolarScope which will allow you to safely view the Sun and map solar spots and other solar activity. We will have special times on Saturday at noon and 2 pm to do this as an outside group activity.”

Darlene Mason-Taylor, the Education Coordinator for the Atchison County Historical Society, said this Family Saturday is a great opportunity for family learning where parents or grandparents can be educators and second learners in this set of hands-on and facilitated activities. She added there are a number of projects that encourage children and families to become citizen scientists beyond the Science Fun Family Day.

“There is a lot of material here and we will host additional family days and take these programs to other summer and regular school year groups,” said Mason-Taylor. “The family setting is where this should have the most impact for education and fun sharing within the family and with different age groups there are unique opportunities that can spark observing the Earth and Sky throughout the summer and you can report your observations to make a real impact on science.”

All ages are welcome for Family Day, and Atchison County’s Museum encourages word-of-mouth (or electronics) passing the word to friends and family who might like to attend any of our Educational Programs in the Museum. Need more info? – check us out on Facebook:  Facebook.com/AtchisonHistory  -or email the Museum at GoWest@atchisonhistory.org or call the museum 913-367-6238. Please pass-the-word to others you think would be interested in attending.

Summer Storytime in the Museum will begin Tuesday June 4th, 2019 and continue each Tuesday through the Summer – details and specifics storytime topics will be announced.

 

KFB’s Foundation for Agriculture awards $25,000 in scholarships

Each year Kansas Farm Bureau (KFB) Foundation for Agriculture awards scholarships to college students studying in fields that benefit agriculture and rural Kansas. Forty-two recipients received $25,000 in scholarships for the 2019-20 school year.

Over the past decade, the foundation has awarded more than $300,000 in scholarships.

“We’re investing in students today to ensure they become tomorrow’s leaders,” says KFB President and Foundation Chair Rich Felts.

Dixie Miller, Reno County, is the winner of the $500 Godfrey and Emma Bahr Miller Agriculture Scholarship, a permanent, privately endowed scholarship fund for students attending a college in Kansas and majoring in a subject related to agronomy and conservation.

Cade Hibdon, Franklin County, was awarded $1,000 for the Frank & Helen Bernasek Memorial Scholarship.

Sara Schlickau, Reno County, received $1,000 for the K-State Agricultural Communications and Journalism Scholarship.

Jacqueline Clawson, Meade County, was awarded $500 for the DeWitt Ahlerich Memorial Scholarship.

Seven students received scholarships to Kansas technical colleges. They are Gage Harding, Neosho County; Dylan Helwig, Cherokee County; Wyatt Hilt, Cheyenne County; Talen Quenzer, Thomas County; Wyatt Schuster, Jewell County; Brody Stamm, Washington County; and Lane Wells, Wichita County.

Four $1,000 KFB scholarships were awarded to juniors and seniors enrolled in Kansas State University’s college of agriculture and majoring in a subject related to agriculture. They are Sara Gammon, Bates County, Missouri; Ciara Hodgkinson, Pratt County; Leah Metzger, Butler County; and Katelyn Pinkston, Clay County.

Two $1,000 KFB scholarships were awarded to juniors and seniors enrolled at Fort Hays State University. Recipients are Dani Mangus, Sherman County; and Brianna Stefan, Clark County.

Twenty-five recipients received $500 scholarships. These students are attending a Kansas college with a Kansas Farm Bureau Collegiate chapter. Students must be a Farm Bureau Collegiate member.

Recipients include:

Allen Community College

Barton Community College

Butler Community College

Colby Community College

Fort Hays State University

Fort Scott Community College

Hutchinson Community College

Kansas State University

 Pratt Community College

Kansas Farm Bureau's mission is to strengthen agriculture and the lives of Kansans through advocacy, education and service.

 

ALL AROUND US

SISTERS AND FAMILY VISIT TV SHOW

In the  picture at left twins Janette Martin, Effingham, and Janice Taliaferro, Topeka, appearing on the Today Program in New York  two weeks ago.  They were visiting the Today program with family members Stephanie Martin, Kasey Martin, and little Sophia Martin, Betty Gall, and matriarch Ida Taliaferro, mother, grandmother and great grandmother.  Originally the family had planned to catch the eye of the Today’s producers with the fact that they had four generations present from Kansas; however, the producers wanted to go with twins so Janette and Janice appeared with two other sets of twins.

The Taliaferro family was in New York to visit Janice’s son Andrew who is interning as an oral surgeon.  He will be moving to Philadelphia soon to finish up his internship.  Andrew lives on Long Island.

 

 

THANKS EXPRESSED

Venita Jo Rader wishes to thank everyone for making her 90th birthday so special. She was thrilled and honored with the large attendance at her reception and all of the cards that she received. 

 

MUSCOTAH NEWS ~ Susan Higley

Local graduates were honored Sunday at the Muscotah United Church. Those being honored included college: Tara Palmateer from Highland Community College & HCC Technical, Barbara Scoggins from Fort Hays State University, and Trevor Smith from Omaha; high school: Chaz Donaldson, John Pantle and Lane Scoggins from ACCHS and Clayton Higley from Horton; 8th grade: Louise LaJoie, Aiden Lott, Natalie Navinsky, Lainey Pantle and Emma Smith from Effingham and Arwen Rush from Everest. Congratulations to all graduates.

Several athletes from ACCHS and Horton High will be attending state track and field in Wichita this Friday and Saturday. Good luck to all.  It will be an experience for them to remember.

The church is gearing up for their annual clothing give-away on Friday, May 31 from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. and Saturday, June 1 from 8 to 11 a.m. at the church. If you have clothes for the give-away you can  bring them to the church. They will be sorting and setting up for the event on Thursday, May 30th. There will be clothing for all sizes so the whole family is welcome to come and find something special just for them.

Saturday, June 1, will be the City Wide Garage Sales. Muscotah Outreach sponsors this every year and pays for all advertising. To get your name on the list with some of your items please call Susan at 785-872-3245 or Deanna at 872-3559. The deadline will be May 23rd.

Since it was decided not to have the Muscotah Days this year doesn’t mean we don’t have activities on Saturday,  June 1st.  There will be a car show downtown on the Main Street. Food will be available at the Mercantile.  For more information contact Bill Speer at 785-872-3171.

Another activity in town on Saturday, June 1st will be the Bags of Hope fundraiser to benefit cancer patients of all ages at the city park. Proceeds go to make free comfort bags for cancer patients undergoing treatments. Some of the articles included are Kleenexes, hand sanitizer, hand lotion, pens, notepads, puzzle books and devotions. Children will get crayons, coloring book, stuffed animal and a toy. There will be vendors, games and activities, concession stand, petting zoo, and a dance to end the day. For more information you can contact Shelley Lowe, 913-426-2347. In conjunction with the event there will be a Fun Run that will end their ride in Muscotah. They are riding in honor of all cancer patients. You can also contact Shelley for more information on the run.

Tickets for a chance to win a quarter of donated black Angus beef  are still available at the Muscotah Mercantile and in Horton at The Hair Den, Lentz Express, Susan Gordon’s, Horton Thriftshop and Horton Tire. Proceeds from this will allow the Muscotah Cancer Support Group to help local cancer patients with extra expenses for travel to doctor appointments and treatments. The group would like to thank everyone for their help and support and for the meat donation.  The drawing will be held in July, the date and time to be announced later.

We had a few days of sunshine, but now the weatherman is talking rain for most of the week.  Hopefully the forecast will change.

 

UNAPPROVED MINUTES-CITY OF MUSCOTAH

The Muscotah City Council met in regular session on May 13, 2019 at 7:00 PM at City Hall. Mayor Brian Higley called the meeting to order. Susan Higley made the motion to accept the minutes for the April 8, 2019 meeting as presented. Margaret Jacobs seconded the motion, motion carried 4-0.

FINANCIAL REPORT- The ledger was reviewed by council. Dolly Wilson made the motion to accept the financial report as presented. Dale Small seconded the motion, motion carried 4-0.

UTILITY DELINQUENT REPORT-22 late notices were sent out. It was decided to pull one meter for non-payment on Tuesday. Council will be pulling meters for non-payment if payment is not paid by cut off date. No further time will be allowed and no post-dated checks will be accepted.

BILL PAYMENT-Susan Higley made the motion to approve payment of bills #6633-6654 and 4 EFT payments. Margaret Jacobs seconded the motion, motion carried 4-0.

MAINTENANCE REPORT-More gravel is still needed to get streets finished. Water and Electric systems are operating without problems. One dog was picked up and taken to the vet. Weed notices will be sent this week for those in violation of the ordinance.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS-KLM has been contacted with the question of piggy backing with another municipality’s municipal court. No answer has been received yet.

Mike is still waiting for dry weather to pour cement for the hall addition.

NEW BUSINESS-The ball is need of painting. Dolly requested that the city make the city truck available. Mike volunteered to paint the top of the ball from the truck’s bucket.

Margaret will purchase a plant from the city for the funeral of Tammara Boatright.

GOVERNING BODY COMMENTS-Susan reported that several activities will be going on in Muscotah on June 1st; the car show will be downtown, and bags of hope for cancer patients’ event in the park, clothing give away at the United Church and garage sales. Susan hasn’t heard back yet from Eric Dylan concerning the event scheduled for July 14th. Old time ball game will be held the last Saturday in July to celebrate Tinker Day. The teams are the North Texas Cattleman from Dallas and Western BBC from Topeka.

Margaret Jacobs made the motion to adjourn. Dale Small seconded the motion, motion carried 4-0.

Debbie Liggatt, City Clerk

 

FROM PASTOR AL ~ Al Schirmacher

true needs met fully -

need for rest

need for peace

need for renewal 

need for guidance

need for intimacy

need for resources

need for honor

need for love

need for eternity

all met because He’s -

shepherd

counselor 

guide

companion 

host

benefactor

homebuilder

God

 “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. 

He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. 

He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake. 

Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. 

Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. 

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever.” Psalms 23:1-6 KJV

Al Schirmacher

 

Sometimes it’s not a bird....

Yesterday, while birdwatching, had a bobcat at Atchison County Lake.

Past mammals include fox, possum, coyote, deer (obviously), snapping and other turtles, otters, muskrat, beaver, weasels, moose, fishers, jackrabbit, badgers, black bear (joined our field trip), star-nosed mole....

Perhaps the best was a leisurely look at a wolf on appropriately named Nature Avenue in Aitkin County MN.

Sometimes the goal is superseded by the serendipitous.

God can be that way.

Al Schirmacher

 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Summer Schedules ~ Kim Baldwin, McPherson County farmer and rancher

We're beginning to notice small changes in our wheat crop. The short green fields are growing tall. Before long, the wheat will begin turning from the vivid greens to the golden hues signaling the nearness of summer harvest.

While driving into town for school with my son recently, the topic of summer came up. For many kiddos, summer means sleeping in, swim lessons, drive-in movies or summer camps.

When I asked my boy what his plans were for this summer, his answer included swimming, fishing, riding his bike, playing baseball, visiting a museum and going on a trip.

“But we have to harvest the wheat first, Mom,” he concluded matter-of-factly.

My boy knows how we kick off summer on our farm.

For many families, once school is out, vacations, barbecues, a slower pace and freedom are all imminent.

Once classes are over for my family, our days consist of finishing up the planting of our corn, soybeans and sorghum, rushing to get ready for wheat harvest and then racing storms to get the crop out of the fields. It’s the busiest time of the year, and it’s a family affair that both of my children have always been a part of.

During harvest my son helps with delivering meals, riding in the combines next to his dad and grandpa, and helps deliver the grain to our local elevator. He takes his harvest jobs very seriously. The jobs require a lot of time, so we try not to schedule a lot during this period.

Swim lessons and afternoon fishing trips are often substituted by playing with a water hose in the front yard and practicing casting techniques off the front porch after coming in for the evening. Sleeping in generally doesn’t happen because we want to utilize the coolness of the mornings before the heat rolls in to accomplish other tasks on the farm. Drive-in movies just don’t work because we are either out harvesting late into the night or are too tired to stay awake for a show.

Simple pleasures like campouts in the living room, popsicles, taste testing freshly baked cookies for our harvest crew and running through the sprinklers when the opportunity presents itself are the norm for my children during the summer harvest. Although they are simple, they are thoroughly enjoyed and embraced by my kids. It’s all part of being a farm kid during the summer months.

My boy knows wheat harvest is what we do first before we can start checking off our other fun summer activities from our to-do list.

I always find it interesting how he accepts our crazy schedule. I suppose it is because it’s what he has always known. I’m still thankful he recognizes the importance of getting the wheat harvested while also finding ways to enjoy his summer.
"Insight" is a weekly column published by Kansas Farm Bureau, the state's largest farm organization whose mission is to strengthen agriculture and the lives of Kansans through advocacy, education and service. 

 

GOVERNMENTAL NEWS

Unapproved Minutes of the May 14 Meeting of the Atchison Co. Commission

Pursuant to the law, the Atchison County Commission Board met in Regular Session at 1:00 PM on the 1st floor of the courthouse, 423 N 5th St. Atchison, KS. Chairman Jack Bower called the meeting to order with Commissioner Henry W. Pohl and Commissioner Eric Noll, and County Counselor Patrick Henderson present for the meeting. County Clerk, Michelle Phillips recorded the minutes.

The Board recited the pledge of allegiance to start the meeting.

*Public Comment:

John Rasmussen appeared before the Board to see if there was any results from the nuisance complaint he presented to the Board during the March 26, 2019 meeting. County Counselor Patrick Henderson told Mr. Rasmussen that he has sent a request to Northeast Kansas Environmental Services asking for an update. Counselor Henderson also gave Mr. Rasmussen the contact information for the staff at Northeast Kansas Environmental Services.

Mr. Rasmussen also asked what the Board planned on doing since the termination of the Road & Bridge Superintendent. Chairman Bower told Mr. Rasmussen that an interim has been put into place and the position has been posted for hiring a new Superintendent.

Objectives will be given to the newly hired superintendent.

Chairman Bower read a Proclamation for Emergency Medical Services Week.

Chairman Bower moved to proclaim the week of May 19th - 25th, 2019, as Emergency Medical Services Week. Commissioner Noll seconded the motion. Chairman Bower call for a vote, all voted aye. The motion carried 3-0. Corey Scott, Emergency Medical Services Director, was present to receive the proclamation. Director Scott was joined by his current on-duty crew:

Michelle Bettencourt, Paramedic

Vicky Dukart, EMT

Jessica Housh, EMS/EM Office Manager /Emergency Medical Responder

Captain Liggett, Paramedic/Rescue Volunteer

Chief Ted Graf and John Rasmussen, Atchison Fire Department.

Chairman Bower read the 100th anniversary of the Atchison County Health Department proclamation recognizing May 17, 2019 as Atchison County Public Health Department 100th Anniversary Day. Chairman Bower moved to adopt the Atchison County Health Department proclamation. Commissioner Pohl seconded the motion. Chairman Bower call for a vote, all voted aye. Camron Roloff of the Atchison County Health Department was present.

The minutes of the May 7, 2019 meeting were reviewed with no corrections noted.Commissioner Noll made a motion to approve the minutes as read. Commissioner Pohl seconded the motion. Chairman Bower called for a vote, all voted aye. Motion passed 3-0.

*New Business Before the Board:

Ray Ladd, Atchison County Extension Agent, appeared before the Board with the 2020 budget request for the Atchison County Extension. Diane Nielson, County Extension Agent, appeared with Mr. Ladd along with board members: Janet Settich, Rikki Kanning, Kent Simms, and Larry Lintner. Each of the Board members spoke about the Extension Office and what it offers to the citizens of the County, along with the aspirations for the future.

Teresa McAnerney, appeared before the Board for the 2020 budget request for Northeast Kansas Enterprise Facilitation. Chairman Bower asked that she return next week after sending in the paperwork asked for in March 2019.

The Board was presented with a purchase order from the Road & Bridge Department payable to Kansas City Freightliner in the amount of $7,052.86 for repairs of truck # 85.

Commissioner Pohl moved to approve the repairs. Commissioner Noll seconded the motion.

Chairman Bower called for a vote, all voted aye. The motion passed 3-0.

The Board was presented with the Community Corrections FY20 Comprehensive Plan along with the FY20 Behavioral Health Grant applications. Commissioner Noll moved to approve the applications. Commissioner Pohl seconded the motion. Chairman Bower called for a vote, all voted aye. The motion passed 3-0.

Commissioner Pohl moved to approve an option to purchase right-of-way agreement signed by landowners located adjacent to bridge number 520 signed by Janice Handke, Trustee. Commissioner Noll seconded the motion. Chairman Bower called for a vote, all voted aye. The motion passed 3-0.

*County Counselor Report:

County Counselor Patrick Henderson, told the Board that he presented a letter for their review to Hamm Quarry, as requested by the Board previously.

*Public Comment:

Gregg Gehring, Walnut Township Trustee, appeared before the Board asking what the status was at the Road & Bridge Department.

Mr. Gehring stated he has spoken to someone in regards to some FEMA information and was wondering who he needed to get an update from.

Mr. Gehring also asked about an update on some nuisance complaints that were previously reported. Counselor Henderson stated he would request an update from Northeast Kansas Environmental Services (NEKES). There was some discussion on roads in Walnut Township.

*New Business Before the Board:

Collin Gilbert, Boy Scouts of America, appeared before the Board to present his Eagle Scout Project. Mr. Gilbert presented a handmade Flag Retirement Dropbox for any American flag. Once the drop box is filled the Boy Scouts will collect the flags and dispose of them properly. The Board was very pleased with the craftsmanship of the drop box. The drop box will be located on the main floor of the courthouse.

*Executive Session:

Commissioner Noll moved that the Board of County Commissioners recess into executive session at 2:00 pm for consultation with an attorney for the public body which would be deemed privileged in the attorney-client relationship, as allowed by K.S.A. 75-4319(b) (2), and that the purpose of the closed session is to protect confidentiality of the discussion, and that the Board come out of the executive session at 2:30 pm, in the commission room, 1st floor, courthouse. Those present will be: The County Commissioners and County Counselor Patrick Henderson. Commissioner Pohl second the motion. Chairman Bower called for a vote, all voted aye, motion carried, 3-0.

There was no action taken during the executive session.

Commissioner Noll moved that the Board of County Commissioners recess into executive session at 2:30 pm for consultation with an attorney for the public body which would be deemed privileged in the attorney-client relationship, as allowed by K.S.A. 75-4319(b) (2), and that the purpose of the closed session is to protect confidentiality of the discussion, and that the Board come out of the executive session at 2:45 pm, in the commission room, 1st floor, courthouse. Those present will be: The County Commissioners and County Counselor Patrick Henderson. Commissioner Pohl second the motion. Chairman Bower called for a vote, all voted aye, motion carried, 3-0.

There was no action taken during the executive session.

Bills were presented to be signed.

Add abate, escapes for real estate and personal property taxes were presented to be approved.

Commissioner Noll made a motion to adjourn the meeting at 2:45 pm. Commissioner Pohl, seconded the motion. Chairman Bower called for a vote, all voted aye. Motion passed 3-0.

Note: Once approved these minutes will be the official minutes of the Board of County Commissioners. Regular meetings of the Board of County Commissioners are video recorded.

The video of these meeting is generally available for supplementation of the minutes. The videos can be located under the Government tab at www.atchisoncountyks.org.

Attest: Michelle Phillips, County Clerk

 

Farmers Are on the Verge of Financial Collapse, Resolve the China Trade Dispute

Urges USDA to Allocate Funds through International Food Aid

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) – member of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture – today offered United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Sonny Perdue his recommendations on how to expand export markets, distribute the potential additional round of trade assistance programs and purchase U.S.-grown commodities for international food aid programs.

First and foremost: resolve the ongoing trade dispute with China.

“The tariffs our country levied against China, and China’s retaliatory tariffs targeted at our farmers and ranchers, threaten to cause long term damage to U.S. agriculture,” Sen. Moran wrote. “Kansas farmers and ranchers understand the need to hold China accountable for bad behavior on trade. Yet, net farm income has fallen by 50 percent since 2013 and the trade war has pushed commodity prices down even further. Many farmers and ranchers are on the verge of financial collapse. Another round of payments to producers and commodity purchases by USDA may provide short term relief for farmers, but will not make up for lost export markets and long term implications of the trade disputes.”

“The President has encouraged U.S. consumers to not buy goods from China as a way to avoid paying tariffs,” Sen. Moran continued. “However, consumers changing their purchasing decisions to avoid the tariffs provides no solution or relief for Kansas and other states who are dependent on selling what we produce to China and other foreign markets. The same logic expressed by President Trump applies to foreign buyers who are choosing to no longer purchase U.S. agriculture commodities in a similar attempt to avoid the retaliatory tariffs applied to our exports.”

“When determining the design of the trade programs, I urge you to include investments in international food aid programs, make certain payments to farmers do not distort planting decisions, and focus export promotion programs on new markets immediately available to producers,” Sen. Moran continued. “I agree with President Trump that investing in international food aid ought to be a component of trade assistance efforts.”

Full text of the letter is below.

 

The Honorable Sonny Perdue

Secretary United States Department of Agriculture

1400 Independence Ave., SW

Washington, D.C. 20250

Dear Secretary Perdue:

I write to express my continued concerns regarding the impact the ongoing trade war with China is having on Kansas farmers and ranchers, and offer my recommendations on the potential additional round of trade assistance programs.

The administration’s top priority ought to be to quickly and successfully resolve the ongoing trade disputes to provide greater market certainty for farmers and ranchers. I am disappointed trade discussions with China took a step back, resulting in the most recent escalation in the trade war.

Kansas farmers’ and ranchers’ ability to earn a living depends on selling the food and fiber they grow around the world. Without exports, the question becomes: what 48 percent of wheat acres do we no longer plant in Kansas? The income generated by exports keeps Kansas producers in business and sustains our rural communities.

The President has encouraged U.S. consumers to not buy goods from China as a way to avoid paying tariffs. However, consumers changing their purchasing decisions to avoid the tariffs provides no solution or relief for Kansas and other states who are dependent on selling what we produce to China and other foreign markets. The same logic expressed by President Trump applies to foreign buyers who are choosing to no longer purchase U.S. agriculture commodities in a similar attempt to avoid the retaliatory tariffs applied to our exports.

The tariffs our country levied against China, and China’s retaliatory tariffs targeted at our farmers and ranchers, threaten to cause long term damage to U.S. agriculture. Kansas farmers and ranchers understand the need to hold China accountable for bad behavior on trade. Yet, net farm income has fallen by 50 percent since 2013 and the trade war has pushed commodity prices down even further. Many farmers and ranchers are on the verge of financial collapse.

Another round of payments to producers and commodity purchases by USDA may provide short term relief for farmers, but will not make up for lost export markets and long term implications of the trade disputes. It is also important to recognize the harm the tariffs have inflicted on U.S. manufacturers and businesses, which have not received disaster relief. 

Recent analysis of a cross section of Kansas farms by the Kansas Farm Management Association found Market Facilitation Program (MFP) payments comprised an average of 37 percent of the net farm income in 2018. These figures indicate the financial safety net MFP payments provided for many producers last year. At the same time, I am concerned the increased reliance of farm income generated from government payments instead of markets is not sustainable.

While USDA recently announced it will move forward with another round of trade assistance, you have been clear that producers should not anticipate MFP payments in the future. In other words, an average farmer in Kansas cannot count on 37 percent of last year’s income going forward. This inherent unpredictability of ad hoc disaster assistance underlies the strong preference of farmers and ranchers for markets to sell their livestock and crops instead of government payments.

Farmers and ranchers are hurting. It is critical the upcoming trade assistance be structured in a manner that does maximum good for our farmers and ranchers. When determining the design of the trade programs, I urge you to include investments in international food aid programs, make certain payments to farmers do not distort planting decisions, and focus export promotion programs on new markets immediately available to producers.

I agree with President Trump that investing in international food aid ought to be a component of trade assistance efforts. There are four areas in the world facing famine or near-famine conditions, and over 800 million food insecure people total. Of those people, approximately 113 million people are in imminent danger of death due to starvation. We must do better at getting the food we grow across Kansas and our country to starving people around the world. This trade assistance package offers us an opportunity to do good and save lives around the world, while also helping American producers at home by purchasing and shipping U.S.-grown commodities. I urge you to allocate additional funds through the Food for Peace and McGovern-Dole International Food for Education programs, or initiatives of similar design.

It is reported that payments directly to producers will be a significant portion of the trade assistance. Farmers planting for the market, not government programs, has been a central tenant of farm policy for over two decades. It is important this principle continue to be followed and for trade payments to not distort planting decisions. This can be accomplished by basing payment acres on a farmer's recent history of planted acres, and yields on the higher of actual 2018 yields or average, historic yields for each commodity. Further, payment rates for each commodity should be determined in a manner that recognizes both direct and indirect impacts of the trade dispute.

Finally, investments in export promotion programs ought to be focused on finding and developing new markets that are immediately available to producers. I recommend placing an emphasis on promoting commodities exports not included in the direct payments to producers, particularly livestock and meat exports.

I recognize the desire for another round of trade assistance payments as farmers and ranchers have been caught in the middle of the trade war with China. I also reiterate my strong preference to see our ongoing trade disputes resolved for the benefit of Kansas farmers and ranchers. Thank you for your consideration of my recommendations. 

 

Sen. Moran Introduces Bipartisan Legislation to Improve Accuracy of Broadband Coverage Maps

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) – member of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation – introduced the Broadband Data Improvement Act (BDIA) with U.S. Senators Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.), Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) and Jon Tester (D-Mont.). This legislation would improve the accuracy of broadband coverage maps and better direct federal funds for broadband buildout. The bill would require broadband providers to report data in a way that more accurately reflects locations they actually serve – a change from current reporting requirements. This would create a new, improved National Broadband Map that is significantly more accurate and granular, as well as subject to an ongoing and multi-faceted challenge, validation and refinement process.

“In order for rural Kansas to compete in today’s digital economy, we need effective, efficient and reliable broadband,” said Sen. Moran. “This legislation will help make certain the FCC is working from an accurate and up-to-date broadband map as it continues its deployment efforts in rural America. I will work to address the communications needs facing our country, and I encourage my colleagues to support this important legislation.”

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are charged with allocating billions of dollars each year to ensure that broadband coverage gaps are closed. However, there is broad bipartisan consensus that the data the FCC collects is not sufficiently accurate or granular to pinpoint these gaps or guide decision-making on where funds should be directed to support broadband buildout.

The BDIA would require broadband providers to report data to create an improved National Broadband Map that is significantly more accurate and granular, as well as subject to an ongoing and multi-faceted challenge, validation and refinement process. Accurate and granular data will enable federal agencies to target funding to the areas that need it the most, close the remaining coverage gaps and ensure accountability and transparency.

This legislation is supported by a broad range of groups and organizations, including NCTA-The Internet & Television Association, NTCA-The Rural Broadband Association, the American Farm Bureau Federation, the Microsoft Corporation, the Competitive Carriers Association (CCA) and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA).

Building on the many lessons learned from past state and federal data collection and mapping efforts, the Broadband Data Improvement Act would comprehensively improve the National Broadband Map in the following key ways:

·                    Granular Service Availability Data – Requires broadband providers to report service availability by submitting GIS shape files that indicate actual network coverage, completely updating or replacing the current Form 477 process.

·                    Three-pronged Data Validation Process –

o        The collection of public feedback regarding the accuracy of the map, obtained via a new feedback tool that will be integrated into the online mapping platform.

o        The acquisition of third-party commercial datasets on broadband availability that are analyzed and compared against provider-reported data.

o        Targeted on-the-ground field validation of services in areas where public feedback and third-party data suggest the map is incorrect.

·                    Periodic Challenge Process – Requires the establishment of an ongoing, efficient and scheduled process by which the public and broadband service providers may challenge the map, and through which the FCC analyzes and resolves any challenges to update the map accordingly.

·                    Federal Funding Programs Guidance and Broadband Investments Tracking – Requires the National Broadband Map to be utilized by federal agencies to identify areas that remain unserved and track where awarded funds have actually resulted in broadband buildout.

·                    Data Submission Assistance to Small Providers – Minimizes the burden on smaller service providers that may not have GIS capabilities by providing data submission assistance to ensure the information they report is as accurate as possible.

Full text of the legislation can be found here.

 

Kansas sues Purdue Pharma over unlawful marketing of opioids

TOPEKA – (May 16, 2019) – Kansas has sued Purdue Pharma, alleging that the drug company engaged in unlawful practices in the marketing of its opioid products including OxyContin, Attorney General Derek Schmidt said.

The lawsuit, filed today in Shawnee County District Court, seeks civil penalties and injunctive relief under the Kansas Consumer Protection Act. It alleges that Purdue repeatedly made false and deceptive claims that its opioid products were safe and suitable for a wide range of pain patients and that Purdue failed to support its claims with adequate medical research. Specifically, the lawsuit alleges that Purdue falsely claimed:

·                     Its opioid products posed a low risk of addiction.

·                     Symptoms of addiction were in fact only “pseudoaddiction” indicating the need for more opioids.

·                     Long-term opioid use improved patients’ quality of life and function.

·                     Opioids were suitable for vulnerable groups such as elderly patients and veterans.

In 2007, Purdue and three of its top executives pleaded guilty to felony and misdemeanor criminal charges of misbranding OxyContin in violation of federal law. The lawsuit filed today alleges that despite that plea agreement, Purdue continued to make false, unconscionable, deceptive, and misleading claims about its opioid products including OxyContin.

From 1999 to 2017, almost 218,000 people died in the United States from overdoses related to prescription opioids, according to the U.S. Centers on Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Opioids are the single leading cause of accidental death in the United States, with overdoses killing an estimated 130 Americans every day. According to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, prescription opioids are a leading cause of drug poisoning deaths in Kansas with between 70 and 120 people dying from opioid poisoning annually over the past decade.

The rise in opioid use has contributed to many abusers turning to heroin, fentanyl and other illicit drugs, fueling a five-fold increase in heroin overdoses nationally from 2010 to 2017.

In addition to Kansas, four other states today filed lawsuits against Purdue and related individuals or entities. For months, Schmidt and other attorneys general have been investigating Purdue and other opioid manufacturers and distributors. At the same time, the attorneys general have engaged in ongoing settlement negotiations with the company in coordination with a multidistrict litigation overseen by U.S. District Judge Dan Polster in Ohio. Those negotiations are ongoing.

A copy of the attorney general’s petition filed today may be found at http://bit.ly/2Q99AR2.

 

Saturday is National Missing Children’s Day

TOPEKA – (May 20, 2019) – As National Missing Children’s Day is observed this Saturday, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt is reminding Kansas parents to talk to their children about ways to stay safe.

“Communication is key to ensuring our children have the tools they need to stay safe,” said Schmidt, who noted that National Missing Children's Day is observed May 25 each year. “It’s important for parents to put a safety plan in place and regularly take time to review it with your kids. National Missing Children’s Day is a good reminder to have those important conversations, and I encourage all Kansans to do so.”

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) maintains a list of children missing from Kansas. That database can be accessed at www.missingkids.org. Anyone with information about the whereabouts of any of these missing persons should contact a law enforcement agency or call 1-800-KS-CRIME. Information about missing children also can be reported to NCMEC at 1 (800) THE-LOST (800-843-5678). The NCMEC list currently includes the names, photographs and other information about the 74 children missing from Kansas. Schmidt, as immediate past president of the National Association of Attorneys General, is currently serving as a member of NCMEC’s Law Enforcement Advisory Council.

Schmidt also reminded parents of the importance of keeping identifying information on children up-to-date in the event a child does become missing. Having an identity kit with the child’s fingerprints, height, weight, and a current photo can make it easier to quickly locate a missing child.

May 25 was first designated as National Missing Children’s Day by President Ronald Reagan in 1983. It serves as an annual reminder of the efforts to reunite missing children with their families.

To access the list of the 74 missing children from Kansas, go to www.missingkids.org/search. In the search box choose “Missing From,” select Kansas, then submit.

 

SECOND AMENDMENT RIGHTS EXTEND OUTSIDE THE HOME

TOPEKA – (May 16, 2019) – The constitutional right to keep and bear arms extends outside a person’s home, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt this week told the U.S. Supreme Court.

At issue in the case is a New York City law that prohibits an individual who has obtained a license to own a firearm in their home from transporting that firearm anywhere, even if locked and unloaded, except to one of the shooting ranges located within city limits. Under the ordinance, it is illegal for a New York resident to transport a firearm to a shooting range in a nearby state.

In the legal brief filed this week, Schmidt along with 21 other state attorneys general and the governors of Kentucky and Mississippi, asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a ruling by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upholding the city ordinance. The attorneys general argue the ordinance unconstitutionally restricts the right to use a firearm for self-defense and defense of family outside of the home, restricts the right to travel and discriminates against interstate commerce.  

“If New York’s regulatory scheme is allowed to stand and is copied by cities around the United States, it would undercut the ability of individuals to travel with their individual rights intact and also threaten state economies dependent upon tourism dollars,” the attorneys general wrote.

The case is New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. City of New York, New York, No. 18-280. A copy of the states’ brief is available at http://bit.ly/2Qem0qR. The Supreme Court is expected to hear oral argument on the case in the fall.

 

Junction City Woman Ordered To Repay More Than $3,800 For Medicaid Fraud

WESTMORELAND – (May 17, 2019) – A Junction City woman has been ordered to repay more than $3,800 to the Kansas Medicaid Program after pleading guilty to Medicaid fraud-related charges, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said.

Terry Sherrick, 50, pleaded guilty March 15, 2019, in Pottawatomie County District Court to one felony count of making a false claim to the Medicaid program, one felony count of theft and one felony count of unlawful acts concerning computers. District Judge Jeff Elder yesterday ordered the defendant to repay $3,870.31 to the Kansas Medicaid Program. Judge Elder also sentenced Sherrick to 12 months of probation with an underlying sentence of eight months in the Kansas Department of Corrections.  

An investigation by the attorney general’s Medicaid Fraud and Abuse Division revealed that Sherrick repeatedly checked her personal care attendant into Authenticare, the Medicaid electronic billing system, using her phone. Sherrick claimed the personal care attendant was providing home based services, when in fact the personal care attendant was clocked in and working for other employers. The pay for the personal care services was placed into a joint checking account accessible to both Sherrick and the personal care attendant. An analysis of the Medicaid payment data showed 370 hours of overlapping time billed by Sherrick on behalf of her personal care attendant.  The time billed overlapped time the personal care attendant worked for other employers. The crimes occurred between October 2015 and July 2016.

Assistant Attorney General Alma Heckler of Schmidt’s office prosecuted the case.

 

WICHITA WOMAN PLEADS GUILTY TO MEDICAID FRAUD, RELATED CHARGES

WICHITA – (May 17, 2019) – A Wichita woman today pleaded guilty to Medicaid fraud and related charges, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said.

Jessica Jo Washington, 32, pleaded guilty in Sedgwick County District Court to one count of Medicaid fraud and one count of felony mistreatment of a dependent adult. The charges stemmed from an investigation by the attorney general's Medicaid Fraud and Abuse Division, which revealed that Washington mistreated a resident while working as a Certified Nurse Aide in a Sedgwick County nursing facility. The crimes occurred in July 2018.

As a condition of the plea, Washington has agreed to voluntarily surrender her certification with the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services. District Judge Terry Pullman accepted the plea and scheduled sentencing for July 9 at 8:45 a.m.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant Attorney General Meghan Markey of Schmidt's office.

Kansas filed the case as part of a sweep of Medicaid Fraud enforcement actions involving misconduct by health care providers. As part of that effort, the Kansas attorney general filed criminal charges against ten individuals. Four of those individuals have now been found guilty. Six additional cases remain pending.

 

MISCELLANEOUS PRESS RELEASES

Lots of Flowers, Lots of Seeds

Each week, Ward Upham, K-State Extension horticulture specialist, puts together timely articles on gardening, turf, and landscapes and this weeks’ seems to hit the target on many trees in Atchison county.  The following is what he shares that addresses the many lovely blossoms and the not-so-lovely seeds many have observed. (Too bad we don’t have a good use or market for “helicopter” maple seeds.)

            “I have never seen lilacs bloom like they did this year.  Also, elms and maples have produced enormous amounts of seed in some areas.  In certain cases, this has delayed leaf emergence, especially in the upper portions of the tree, “ says Ward Upham.

Why did this happen?  What triggered it?

          We know that stress can cause trees and shrubs to put more energy into seed production.   The strategy seems to produce lots of seed in case the “mother” plant dies.  This large expenditure of energy means that there was less energy left over to push out leaves in the spring resulting in delayed leaf emergence.

          So, let’s look at the likely cause.  Remember the flowers and seeds that were produced this year came from buds that were produced last year during the growing season.  Therefore, it was a stress that came last year that caused the problem.  Actually, I think it was a stress from the Fall of 2017 through much of the Spring of 2018 that triggered the plants.  In the Manhattan area, we had adequate rainfall through October of 2017, but then virtually nothing until May of 2018.  This drought was severe enough that root systems were likely damaged so that even when rainfall returned, the plant was under moisture stress, especially in the upper portions of the tree.  This stress, then, stimulated the plant to set an abnormally high number of fruit buds resulting in tremendous flowering and seed production this year.

          What do we do about this?  First, don’t assume a tree is dead if leaves don’t appear immediately.  Also, don’t assume the top portion of the tree is dead if it is slower to leaf out than the lower portions of the tree.  Give the tree a few more weeks and see what happens.

          Next, these trees and shrubs don’t have a lot of energy reserves left so they need to be given extra care.  Primarily this means watering as needed.  Keep in mind that too much water is as bad as too little.  Roots need to breathe; they need oxygen.  With the excessive rains much of Kansas has received recently, it may be a while before watering needs to be done.  Just don’t wait too long as the damaged root system will not be as efficient in taking up the water the plant needs. 

So when do you start watering?  Use a screwdriver to try to penetrate the soil under the tree.  If it is difficult to push the tang of the screwdriver into the soil, it is time to water.  Water enough so that the soil is moist to a depth of one foot.  Use a long-tanged screwdriver, a wooden dowel or a metal rod such as a section of rebar or electric fence post to test.  It will stop when it hits dry soil.  

Thinning fruit

The avoidance of late freezes has resulted in a heavy fruit crop this year. At first glance, this might seem to be a good thing. But too many fruit can cause problems that should be alleviated by removing excess fruit (thinning). For example, a heavy fruit crop can interfere with fruit bud development this summer. This can result in a small to no crop next year. This problem most often appears with apples and peaches. Thus, thinning helps ensure that good crops are produced each year.

          The second benefit of thinning is to promote larger fruit on this year’s crop. Fruit trees are limited in how many fruit they can mature. Too many fruit and fruit size and quality goes down.

          A third problem often caused by too many fruit is limb damage. Sometimes the weight of a maturing fruit crop can literally break branches. Thinning will help limit weight and preserve branches.

          So how much thinning should we do? Thinning recommendations vary with the type of tree. Guidelines for fruit spacing are as follows:

 Apples and pears: 6 to 8 inches apart;

 Peaches: 6 to 8 inches apart;

 Plums and prunes: 4 to 5 inches apart;

 Apricots: 2 to 4 inches between fruit.

          These are averages and so you may have several fruit clustered closer than this distance. As long as the average on the branch is close to the recommended spacing, the fruit should size well. Cherries are not thinned and can produce a full fruit load. 

          The attached photo of a cluster of peaches indicates the heavy fruit set locally. Generally, we would recommend removing 3 or the 4 fruits and if Mother Nature doesn’t shed these, we manually should do this. Always be careful if you have to work from a ladder.  

 

The Beverly Hillbillies Come to Atchison

The lovable Clampett family rides onto the stage for an evening of ‘hillbilly hilarity’ in Theatre Atchison’s final 35th Season production of The Beverly Hillbillies adapted by David Rogers. Based on the original television program by Paul Henning, this hilarious script is filled with the same fun and shenanigans as the beloved classic tale. From absurd adventures to ridiculous romances, this story is truly one you won't want to miss! Performances run May 31st, June 1-2 & 7-9. Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 PM, Sundays at 2 PM.

SHOW SYNOPSIS: This production of The Beverly Hillbillies recreates the pilot episodes of the hilarious TV comedy. Starting in the Clampett's mountain cabin, the play follows them through the discovery of oil, to their improbable invasion of hi-falutin' Beverly Hills. True to their customs and backwards ways, the redneck Clampett family is sure to cause quite a ruckus among the high society of "Californy.”

"The Beverly Hillbillies" is produced by special arrangement with THE DRAMATIC PUBLISHING COMPANY of Woodstock, Illinois.

 

 Why Kansas Cops Don't Want To Legalize Marijuana — Medical Or Otherwise ~ Nomin Ujiyediin

Law enforcement agencies in Kansas say legalizing even medical marijuana could lead to more black market activity. But it's hard to know what impact marijuana could have because the state doesn't collect much information about it.  Scott Canon / Kansas News Service

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When it comes to marijuana, Kansas is a red state in an increasingly green country.

Three of its neighbors — Colorado, Oklahoma and Missouri — have legalized some form of the drug in recent years. Yet Kansas remains one of four states in the country without a comprehensive medical or recreational marijuana program.

That’s not for lack of trying. This spring, the Legislature passed a bill allowing patients and caregivers to possess CBD — one chemical in marijuana — containing small amounts of THC, a psychoactive component of the plant. The Kansas Health Institute reports that lawmakers have introduced 18 medical marijuana bills since 2006. This year, one got a hearing at the Capitol.

But law enforcement officers representing several of the state’s agencies and professional organizations testified against it. The bill never made it to a vote.

“I only ask that you give deference to the experience, to the opinions of the law enforcement community,” said Kirk Thompson, director of the Kansas Bureau of Investigation, the top law enforcement agency in the state. “We’ve seen the negative side of this issue.”

The agency denied requests for an interview with Thompson and didn’t answer emailed questions about its marijuana enforcement strategy. But Thompson’s statement echoes the position of many of the state’s law enforcement agencies and organizations.

They argue that even legalization of medical marijuana would increase car accidents and violent crime and make it easier for foreign drug cartels to move weed onto the black market.

Law enforcement officers say weed is inherently tied to violence, especially from Mexican cartels. And they report an increase in marijuana-related traffic stops in Kansas, especially since Colorado legalized recreational sales of the drug in 2014.

“In every way, marijuana is driving up public health and public safety concerns,” said Jeffrey Stamm, executive director of the Kansas City-based Midwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, under the Office of National Drug Control Policy. “In terms of the psychopharmacology, the economic, the criminal, the social costs of marijuana use, cops, in fact, are the experts.”

But ultimately, it’s hard to know what impact marijuana has on public safety in Kansas because the state doesn’t collect much of that information.

Anecdotes and Statistics

The federal Drug Enforcement Administration publishes data on its Cannabis Eradication Program, including arrests, number of plants seized and the value of assets seized in each state.

But the Kansas Bureau of Investigation doesn’t do the same.

KBI says in 2018, more than 45% of its crime lab’s blood drug tests came back positive for THC. In 2013, only 29% of those blood tests indicated the presence of THC. But the agency doesn’t track the total number of marijuana seizures in the state, nor does it track the total number of marijuana arrests.

In an email, a spokeswoman said the agency’s statewide crime reporting system was “extremely outdated,” deriving statistics from police reports that don’t distinguish which specific drugs were involved in an incident.

The agency also doesn’t track the origin of marijuana seizures in Kansas — whether the drugs came from inside the state, from another U.S. state such as Colorado or California, or from an international source like a Mexican cartel.

A 2016 survey of law enforcement agencies conducted by the Kansas Attorney General’s office found that it’s hard for police to conclusively find out where drugs are from. They rely on statements from suspects, receipts,  labels on packages, or stops near Kansas’ western border to determine whether marijuana comes from pot-friendly Colorado.

Some survey respondents said they had made an increasing number of arrests for DUIs and people carrying marijuana products, especially edibles, since 2014. Others, however, noted no increase or said sample sizes were too small to tell.

Kansas Highway Patrol Lt. Chris Bauer, who teaches officers to recognize whether drivers have been using drugs, said the patrol has noticed an increase in drivers being impaired by marijuana. The Highway Patrol says 62% of lab tests of impaired drivers in 2018 came back positive for THC. Two years earlier, 54% of labs found traces of the drug. Yet those tests aren’t always a reliable indicator of how recently someone used cannabis.

In a phone interview, Bauer said he believes the increase is a result of “society’s changing attitude toward cannabis, and then also the fact that we’re surrounded by states who now have legalized it.”

In 2018, the Kansas Highway Patrol confiscated 13,029 pounds of marijuana in 322 seizures. In 2017, the agency made 399 seizures and confiscated 7,488 pounds.

Bauer said many troopers have begun getting rid of small amounts of marijuana by the side of the road during traffic stops, rather than arresting and charging everyone for possession. Those stops don’t get recorded.

“Maybe we don’t want to take everybody to jail for a small amount of marijuana,” Bauer said. “Jails are full. We sort of have to triage what we’re doing.”

Kansas Department of Transportation data shows that drug-related traffic collisions have remained at about 0.5% of all accidents over the past decade, but the agency does not collect information on specific drugs.

‘Arrows in Their Quiver’

State Sen. David Haley, a former prosecutor who co-sponsored the medical marijuana bill in the Kansas Senate this year, said the state has a strong law enforcement lobby. He thinks officers want to keep marijuana illegal as a pretext to stop and search people.

“I think law enforcement wants to keep as many arrows, if you will, in their quiver,” he said. “I can’t think of any other reason that their lobby has been so adamant.”

Brian Leininger, another former prosecutor who now works as a defense attorney in DUI cases, agrees. 

“Police and other government officials have a lot of social capital,” he said. “They want the status quo. They make their living enforcing the drug laws.”

For about five years, Leininger served as the general counsel for the Kansas Highway Patrol. As a private defense attorney, he still speaks with police regularly and says officers often tell him they oppose the state’s marijuana laws but don’t think they can speak out publicly.

“All the time, officers tell me and other people that ‘it’s really foolish this is illegal. I wish they'd just make it legal. It would make my job easier,’” Leininger said. “‘Alcoholics are violent and dangerous and bad drivers. People under the influence of marijuana are generally calm.’”

He thinks attitudes will change as older officers start retiring and societal attitudes continue to change.

“As the officers get younger, a higher and higher percentage of them grew up with marijuana,” he said. “Eventually, when 45 of the other states have legalized it entirely, maybe Kansas will come around.”

Nomin Ujiyediin reports out of Topeka for the Kansas News Service, a collaboration of KMUW, Kansas Public Radio, KCUR and HPPR covering health, education and politics. You can send her an email at nomin at kcur dot org, or reach her on @NominUJ

Thanks to Kansas News Service for this reprint permission.  More stories to be seen at ksnewsservice.org.

 

Soil Health and Adaptive Grazing Workshop

A Soil Health and Adaptive Grazing Workshop is planned for Thursday, June 6th, 2019 with Shane New as the featured speaker.  The morning session will be held from 8:45 am – 12:45 pm at the Evangel United Methodist Church, 227 Pennsylvania, Holton, KS with lunch and an afternoon field tour from 1:00 pm to 3:30 pm.  New will discuss the 5 Principles of Soil Health and Adaptive Grazing Management practices.  After lunch, the workshop will move to New Family Farms, just North of Holton.  During the workshop, there will be a rainfall simulator and water infiltration demonstration.  Other discussion topics include: soil aggregate structure; paddock fencing & management; livestock management & selection tips; ending with a questions and answers session.

Shane New, Holton, Kansas

Shane has a keen interest in soil biology and the role it plays as the base for all farms. He has a wealth of experience in all phases of production agriculture.

Shane New is a stockman and entrepreneur from Holton, Kansas. He is a graduate of Kansas State University. Shane was a civil contractor and sod producer for 20 years prior to completely focusing on regenerative agriculture. Despite doing various things, he has been advancing soil health on his operation for many years. Some of these practices include no-tilling, cover crops, rotational grazing, and adaptive grazing.

Shane and his wife Kelli have three children, they own and operate New Family Farms located near Holton, Kansas. The farm consists of cover crops, cattle, and free-range chickens. They currently market their meat and eggs.

Shane and New Family Farms received the Soil Health Award in 2017 by the Jackson County Conservation District. This was awarded for outstanding accomplishments in the management of soil health and related sources. Shane also completed Dr. Elaine Ingham’s Life in the Soils courses. His passion is production agriculture and believes that the future for agriculture and human health has to come from regenerative agricultural practices.

Please RSVP to attend by calling Brian Boeckman at 785-364-3329, ext. 136 by May 30th, 2019 to reserve your seating and lunch.  Sponsors for the event include:  Arbor Sod & Seeding; Delaware WRAPS; Jackson County Conservation District; and the Kansas Dept. of Agriculture-Division of Conservation (KDA-DOC).  “Funding provided by the KDA-DOC through appropriation from the Kansas Water Plan.”

“The U.S. Department of Agriculture is an equal opportunity employer and provider.”  If you need accommodation, please call the conservation district office at (785) 364-3329, ext. 136.

 

FHSU’s Impact For Success Reaches Far And Wide

HAYS, Kan. – Thanks to the Virtual College at Fort Hays State University, Josh Fitkin is still learning while he is teaching.

As part of his course work, Fitkin has already passed on lessons he has learned to his students when he was teaching in Iowa and also to fellow educators in Canada, where he now lives.

Fitkin, through Fort Hays State, is already having an impact on people’s lives with his degree.

“As a working teacher, I could use activities that I was doing in class at Fort Hays State, I would use it in school,” Fitkin said of his teaching days in Iowa.

Distance learning through the Virtual College enabled Fitkin to achieve his career goal.

“I could not attend university in Canada,” Fitkin said. “No problem. I’m at Fort Hays State. I can take classes anywhere in the world. That’s the beauty of the distance  learning program.”

Fitkin plans to walk across the stage at Saturday morning’s commencement exercises in Gross Memorial Coliseum after flying into Kansas from Canada just hours earlier. He will earn a master’s degree in instructional technology, part of the Advanced Education Programs Department in the College of Education.

An Iowa native, Fitkin moved his family to Canada about 11 months ago so his wife, a Canadian, could be closer to home. He had already started his online master’s program at FHSU and put the final touches on it just this week.

Since moving to Canada, Fitkin is waiting for the final paperwork for the work visa that will allow him to teach north of the border. In the meantime, his wife, Ruthann, is a substitute teacher, and he drives a shuttle car for a local car dealership in Trenton, Ontario. As part of his Fort Hays State online education, Fitkin was required to teach a professional development session with Canadian teachers.

“I was able to bring to them material that they had never heard of,” Fitkin said. “Again, Fort Hays is educating other teachers through their students. In a way, we’re impacting teachers and students in Canada.”

Fitkin’s advisor, Dr. Suzanne Becking, said the instructional technolgy master’s option is a popular online degree.

“It’s a degree that has been really well-received by teachers, people who have realized that the future for their students is in knowing and understanding some of our technologies out there,” Becking said. “The program itself is instructional technology. The focus is on instruction, not necessarily the technology or the devices. How do you use the technology to get at student learning?”
That is why Fitkin was looking for a master’s degree in the first place. His school in Iowa was buying laptops for each student, so he thought he should learn how to teach social studies and history while using that technology. Fitkin researched schools across the country before deciding on Fort Hays State. The lower cost of getting his degree at FHSU was a consideration, as was the fact he could do the entire program online.

“The master’s program was like thousands of dollars less than at my alma mater,” Fitkin said. “The thing that really made it possible was I never once had to step foot on campus as part of my program. A lot of other universities, even if they have an online program, you have to go there in the summer time for three weeks, something like that. Fort Hays State was completely off campus. I could be at home working from my recliner.”

Once his visa paperwork clears, Fitkin will again be working as an educator in Canada. Fort Hays State’s online degree will have furthered his career.

“With the master’s degree, I will be higher on the pay scale,” Fitkin said. “I also will be considered a highly qualified candidate as opposed to just a qualified candidate. It makes me more employable and gives me more opportunities.”

First, however, was the opportunity to walk across the stage for graduation. Fitkin, who struggled academically at the start of his college experience 20 years ago, has come full circle and will graduate from Fort Hays State with a 4.0 grade-point average. Even though his wife and two young children could not attend, Fitkin was determined to be part of commencement.

“It’s really a big deal for me,” said the 40-year-old Fitkin. “Having flunked out of college, I really wanted to walk, and I accomplished this. It’s going to be a little surreal to go through it. I am glad I am doing it.”

 

FHSU’s Impact For Success Reaches Far And Wide

HAYS, Kan. – Thanks to the Virtual College at Fort Hays State University, Josh Fitkin is still learning while he is teaching.

As part of his course work, Fitkin has already passed on lessons he has learned to his students when he was teaching in Iowa and also to fellow educators in Canada, where he now lives.

Fitkin, through Fort Hays State, is already having an impact on people’s lives with his degree.

“As a working teacher, I could use activities that I was doing in class at Fort Hays State, I would use it in school,” Fitkin said of his teaching days in Iowa.

Distance learning through the Virtual College enabled Fitkin to achieve his career goal.

“I could not attend university in Canada,” Fitkin said. “No problem. I’m at Fort Hays State. I can take classes anywhere in the world. That’s the beauty of the distance  learning program.”

Fitkin plans to walk across the stage at Saturday morning’s commencement exercises in Gross Memorial Coliseum after flying into Kansas from Canada just hours earlier. He will earn a master’s degree in instructional technology, part of the Advanced Education Programs Department in the College of Education.

An Iowa native, Fitkin moved his family to Canada about 11 months ago so his wife, a Canadian, could be closer to home. He had already started his online master’s program at FHSU and put the final touches on it just this week.

Since moving to Canada, Fitkin is waiting for the final paperwork for the work visa that will allow him to teach north of the border. In the meantime, his wife, Ruthann, is a substitute teacher, and he drives a shuttle car for a local car dealership in Trenton, Ontario. As part of his Fort Hays State online education, Fitkin was required to teach a professional development session with Canadian teachers.

“I was able to bring to them material that they had never heard of,” Fitkin said. “Again, Fort Hays is educating other teachers through their students. In a way, we’re impacting teachers and students in Canada.”

Fitkin’s advisor, Dr. Suzanne Becking, said the instructional technolgy master’s option is a popular online degree.

“It’s a degree that has been really well-received by teachers, people who have realized that the future for their students is in knowing and understanding some of our technologies out there,” Becking said. “The program itself is instructional technology. The focus is on instruction, not necessarily the technology or the devices. How do you use the technology to get at student learning?”

That is why Fitkin was looking for a master’s degree in the first place. His school in Iowa was buying laptops for each student, so he thought he should learn how to teach social studies and history while using that technology. Fitkin researched schools across the country before deciding on Fort Hays State. The lower cost of getting his degree at FHSU was a consideration, as was the fact he could do the entire program online.

“The master’s program was like thousands of dollars less than at my alma mater,” Fitkin said. “The thing that really made it possible was I never once had to step foot on campus as part of my program. A lot of other universities, even if they have an online program, you have to go there in the summer time for three weeks, something like that. Fort Hays State was completely off campus. I could be at home working from my recliner.”

Once his visa paperwork clears, Fitkin will again be working as an educator in Canada. Fort Hays State’s online degree will have furthered his career.

“With the master’s degree, I will be higher on the pay scale,” Fitkin said. “I also will be considered a highly qualified candidate as opposed to just a qualified candidate. It makes me more employable and gives me more opportunities.”

First, however, was the opportunity to walk across the stage for graduation. Fitkin, who struggled academically at the start of his college experience 20 years ago, has come full circle and will graduate from Fort Hays State with a 4.0 grade-point average. Even though his wife and two young children could not attend, Fitkin was determined to be part of commencement.

“It’s really a big deal for me,” said the 40-year-old Fitkin. “Having flunked out of college, I really wanted to walk, and I accomplished this. It’s going to be a little surreal to go through it. I am glad I am doing it.”

 

WILDLIFE AND PARKS REPORTS

State Archery Tournament Continues To Grow

PRATT – Three-hundred and fifty students from across Kansas aimed to prove their archery skills at the 10th Annual State Archery in the Schools Tournament at Blythe Family Fitness Center in Pratt on March 30.

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism staff, alongside members of the Kansas Bowhunters Association (KBA), erected the tournament’s 20-foot archery range the day prior. The set-up was complete with a 200-foot safety curtain – a purchase made possible last year thanks to a $3,000 district grant courtesy of the Pratt Rotary Club.

Archers shot for individual and team honors, and the opportunity to compete at the National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP®) competition. Divisions include Elementary School (grades 4-5), Middle School (grades 6-8), and High School (grades 9-12).

How It Works

Each competitor shot 30 arrows over two rounds. Rounds consist of fifteen arrows from 10 meters and fifteen arrows from 15 meters. A bullseye scores 10 points, so a perfect score would be 300. A team is made up of 12-24 shooters, and the team score is the sum of the top 12 scores.

Following the last flight, a “Senior Scholarship Shoot-off” took place where high school seniors shot 15 arrows at 15 meters to compete for scholarship money. First place winners, each receiving a $1,000 scholarship, were Nathanael Godsell of Heritage Academy and Shelby Hettenbach of Chapman High School. These top tier scholarship donations were made possible by the KBA, The Peoples Bank in Pratt and NASP®. Second place winners, each netting a $500 scholarship, were Trenton Jones and Bailey Julian, both from Pittsburg High School. The donations for 2nd place scholarship awards were donated by Dakota Holtgrieve – Edward Jones in Pratt, Eagle Sportz and NASP®.

Participating Schools

Archers hailed from 22 schools, including: Chaparral High School, Chapman Middle School, Chapman High School, Clay Center Community Middle School, Clay Center Garfield Elementary, Clearwater High School, Clearwater Middle School, Dodge City High School, Dodge City Central Elementary, Douglass High School, Greeley County Schools, Heritage Academy, Maize High School, Pittsburg High School, Pratt High School, Riverton High School, Service Valley Charter Academy, Southeast Junior High School, Tyro Christian School, Wakefield High School, Wakefield Middle School, and Warriors Archery.

 

Kansas Reports Safest Hunting Season Yet

PRATT – It can be difficult to quantify the positive effect a public program has, but when it comes to the Kansas Hunter Education program, there’s no denying the program is not only working, but exceeding expectations. The 2018 Kansas hunting season has proved the safest one yet ­– with zero fatalities and a record-low of just four reported firearm-related incidents.

“It has been years of hard work and dedicated services that has brought us to this point,” says Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KDWPT) Hunter Education Program coordinator Kent Barrett. “Having said that, we also know that next year will bring us a whole new set of circumstances that will test us once again.”

Of the four incidents reported in 2018, two were the result of hunters swinging on game; one was attributed to poor firearm handling; and one was the result of the unsafe use of a decoy. Thankfully, none of the reported incidents were fatal.

Though no firearms were involved, Hunter Education staff keep record of treestand-related incidents, as well. Two were reported for 2018, and in both cases the hunters were not wearing fall arrest systems. Neither incident proved fatal.

Kansas Hunter Education staff attribute these record-breaking low numbers to one thing: the program’s more than 1,400 volunteer hunter education instructors who share with students safe firearm handling practices, ethics, wildlife regulations and conservation principles.

According to Barrett, volunteer instructors meet with, teach, and certify approximately 9,000 students per year.

While staff and volunteers would ideally like to see the number of incidents dropped to zero, current reports remain a stark contrast to statistics from 50 years ago when seven lives were lost in a year, two years in a row.

Hunting remains one of the safest outdoor activities in Kansas, but everyone must do their part to keep it that way. As any Kansas Hunter Education instructor will tell you, the best piece of equipment a hunter can have afield is right between his or her ears.

To find a Hunter Education class near you, visit ksoutdoors.com/Services/Education/Hunter.

 

Miller Appointed KDWPT Assistant Secretary

TOPEKA – Mike Miller has been selected to be Assistant Secretary for Wildlife, Fisheries and Boating for the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KDWPT). He replaces Keith Sexson, who retired last December after more than 50 years with the department. Miller will assume his new duties on Monday, April 22, 2019.    

“Mike has been an invaluable member of our team for more than three decades. He has been involved in almost every aspect of the department and has a wealth of knowledge and experience to bring to his new role,” said Brad Loveless, KDWPT Secretary. “He is a great communicator and is well-respected by all who know him. I am looking forward to working closely with him as we grow our programs and serve our constituents.”

"I am humbled and excited to be a part of Secretary Loveless' vision for KDWPT's future," Miller said. "Current Wildlife, Fisheries and Boating staff are as talented and dedicated as any I've seen, and I look forward to working with them to carry on the amazing legacies of previous assistant secretaries."

Miller has worked for KDWPT for more than 35 years. He grew up in Greensburg and graduated from Kansas State University with bachelor’s degrees in Journalism and Graphic Design in 1982. After a short stint with the El Dorado Times newspaper, he was selected to be the wildlife illustrator for the Kansas Fish and Game Commission and Kansas Wildlife magazine. 

He went on to serve as the magazine’s associate editor, editor, and his current position of chief of the Information Production Section, overseeing production of the magazine, all hunting and fishing regulation pamphlets, atlases and brochures and social media presence. In addition to his information duties, Miller also served as a special assistant to the Assistant Secretary, managing various special programs and committees, including Pass It On, a hunter recruitment and retention program.

Miller is an avid angler and hunter. He and his wife of 37 years, Lisa, make their home in Pratt where he will continue to work in the KDWPT Pratt Operations Office.  

 

Public Input Needed for Kansas Monarch Conservation Plan

PRATT – The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KDWPT) is seeking public input on Kansas’ Monarch Conservation Plan through May 30. The Kansas Monarch Conservation Plan outlines a 20-year objective to conserve, enhance and create pollinator habitat on private, public and urban lands through non-regulatory, voluntary efforts. Kansas is a national stronghold for monarch conservation and is uniquely positioned to conserve and enhance large acreages and landscapes ideal for monarch migratory and breeding habitat.

The Kansas Monarch Conservation Plan serves as a guiding document to support ongoing and future conservation efforts, taking into account that successful implementation of the plan will require a multi-sector approach. For this reason, KDWPT has collaborated with individuals from ranching and farming organizations, conservation organizations, industry, agencies, academia, and tribal nations – representing 68 organizations – to set voluntary goals for the conservation of monarchs and other native pollinators.

Any individual or entity planning, implementing or funding monarch conservation activities in Kansas should reference this document and consider providing input.

To view the draft version online, visit https://ksoutdoors.com/Wildlife-Habitats/Wildlife-Conservation/Kansas-Monarch-Conservation-Plan.

For more information on the plan, and to provide input, contact Megan Rohweder at megan.rohweder@ks.gov.

 

Chickadee Checkoff Small Grants Proposals Due May 13

PRATT — The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism (KDWPT) is accepting proposals for the Chickadee Checkoff Small Grants Program through May 13, 2019. Grant recipients may use the funds to carry out projects focused on wildlife diversity and native non-game wildlife species, while addressing the issues and strategies within the Kansas State Wildlife Action Plan.

Through the small grants program, KDWPT is able utilize the talents and expertise of people outside of the department to complete a wide variety of educational, research-based, and habitat projects, as well as the monitoring of non-game wildlife and critical habitats. Past projects include the creation of interactive exhibits at nature centers, and assessing the occupancy, abundance, and species richness of marsh birds at state- and federally-managed wetlands.

The diverse projects completed as a result of Chickadee Checkoff funding have led to numerous publications in scientific journals, educational products, and new information on native non-game wildlife species and their habitats.

Interested parties have until May 13, 2019 to turn in a completed grant proposal.

For more information, including eligibility requirements and to view a list of priority projects for 2019, download the grant guidance document at http://ksoutdoors.com/Services/Wildlife-Diversity/Chickadee-Checkoff/Chickadee-Checkoff-Small-Grants-Program

 

Latest Commission Action Proves Fruitful for Furharvesters

PRATT – At its April 25 meeting in Colby, the Kansas Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KWPT) Commission voted on a number of amendments to current regulations, a few of which will benefit furharvesters.

§     In a 6-0 vote, Commissioners voted in favor of amending current furbearer regulations to clarify how to measure the jaw spread on body-gripping and foothold traps.

§     Commissioners approved an amendment to current furbearer regulations eliminating the requirement that furharvesters permanently surrender the lower canine teeth of an otter when presenting it to the department for tagging.

§     Commissioners approved amendments to current bobcat trapping regulations, removing outdated provisions related to tagging and effective dates on nonresident bobcat hunting permits.

§     Passing 6-0, Commissioners voted to accept an amendment to current fur dealer regulations that will allow the sale of swift fox pelts from states that don’t have tagging requirements for swift foxes.

Other items voted on and approved during the public hearing portion of the meeting include:

§     A series of amendments to regulations which establish hunting, fishing and furharvesting restrictions on department-managed lands. Current restrictions can be viewed on ksoutdoors.com by clicking “Laws, Regulations and Enforcement,” “Law and Regulations,” then “All Regulations.” See K.A.R. 115-8-1.

§     Amendments that will simplify the application process for field trial permits, removing extensive event mapping requirements.

§     An amendment to current dove hunting regulations that will remove pellet guns as a legal method of take.

Commissioners also approved 2019-2020 waterfowl seasons as follows:

Youth

High Plains Unit: Oct. 5-6, 2019

Low Plains Early Zone: Oct. 5-6, 2019

Low Plains Late Zone: Oct. 19-20, 2019

Low Plains Southeast Zone: Nov. 2-3, 2019

Teal

High Plains Unit: Sept. 21-29, 2019

Low Plains Zones: Sept. 14-29, 2019

Duck

High Plains Unit: Oct. 12, 2019 - Jan. 05, 2020 and Jan. 17-26, 2020

Low Plains Early Zone: Oct. 12-Dec. 8, 2019 and Dec. 14-29, 2019

Low Plains Late Zone: Oct. 26-Dec. 29, 2019 and Jan. 18-26, 2020

Low Plains Southeast Zone: Nov. 9, 2019 - Jan. 5, 2020 and Jan. 11-26, 2020

Goose

White-fronted geese: Oct. 26-Dec. 29, 2019 and Jan. 25-Feb. 16, 2020

Dark/Light geese: Oct. 26-27 and Nov. 6, 2019 - Feb. 16, 2020

Light Goose Conservation Order: Feb. 17 - April 30, 2020

The next KWPT Commission meeting is scheduled for Thursday, June 13, 2019 at the Rolling Hills Zoo, 625 N. Hedville Road, in Salina.

 

Rains Won’t Stop State Park Fun

TOPEKA – Widespread spring rains haven’t dampened the outdoor spirit at Kansas state parks, although there will be impacts to some park facilities in eastern Kansas. However, many state parks in the western portion of the state were mostly unaffected by the rainy weather and are open and ready to welcome visitors. They include Wilson, Meade, Cedar Bluff, Glen Elder, Lovewell, Prairie Dog, Webster, Sand Hills and Historic Lake Scott state parks.

Most state parks in the eastern half of Kansas report that campsite and cabin rental opportunities remain even though some facilities in low-lying areas are not usable, such as campgrounds, boat ramps, courtesy docks, beaches and access roads. The campgrounds and cabins at Clinton State Park are on high ground and are open for visitors, although boat ramps and the beach are closed.

Many state parks are located adjacent to federal reservoirs, some of which are holding water to mitigate downstream flooding. As a result, rising water levels can overrun shoreline areas, including wildlife areas. State fishing lakes do not store water for flood control, so they are largely unaffected by rising water. Crawford State Park in southeast Kansas surrounds a state fishing lake, so that park has been unaffected by flooding.

At affected parks, staff are happy to work with visitors to change their reservations to a dry campsite if available, arrange for another date in the future, provide a gift card good for a future stay or issue a refund. Park staff remind visitors to never drive around barricades into floodwaters. Just like driving on streets and highways, the mantra, “Turn Around, Don’t Drown” also applies to state park roads.

Many state parks have special events planned for the weekend prior to the Memorial Day holiday, so there is plenty for park goers to do. Visitors are encouraged to call park offices for up-to-date information and campsite availability for the holiday weekend before setting out on their trip.

Visitors can also go to kshuntfishcamp.com to check on campsite and cabin availability and make reservations. For information about conditions at individual parks, go to https://ksoutdoors.com/State-Parks/State-Park-Alerts or visit KSOutdoors.com and click on State Parks for other information.

 

 

HISTORY IS FUN ~ Robert & Helen Caplinger

Old news from the 1928 Issues of Effingham New Leaf

THE WAY A YOUNG MAN GOT STARTED.  "Rob't Pinder:  Thirty years ago last Saturday, three days after the big snow storm, Oct. 17, 1898, I started in the lumber business with W. C. Alexander at Everest, Kansas.  My duties were to get up at 5 a.m., feed and harness the team, feed and milk the cow, slop the hogs, get breakfast, hitch up the team and be down at the yard by 7 o'clock, work with the team or in the yard all day, do the chores in the evening and go back at night and work on the books.  After three months, I was placed in charge of the Purcell yard, where I remained for three years' getting married during that time.  In 1902, we bought the lumber yard at Havensville which I managed for 10 years, coming to Effingham in 1912."  Mr. Pinder has one of the nicest lumber yards in the country of which he is president, and local manager.  He is also secretary, treasurer and general manager of sthe Alexander Lumber Co. and is a partner with his brother T. B. Pinder, of Clifton, in two other yards.  He has served on the city council several years and is now serving his second term as mayor of Effingham."  (11-2-28)

NOT A GOOD WAY TO TRY OUT A NEW CAR.  "Mr. and Mrs. Lovelace, of Muscotah had a narrow escape Wednesday, when he lost control of a Chevrolet car that Frank Hitchner was demonstrating to him.  In trying to stop the car, Mr. Lovelace stepped on the gas instead of the brake, causing the car to jump a ditch.  Mrs. Lovelace suffered three broken ribs and bruises on her head and hip.  Mrs. Wm Parrott of Effingham is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lovelace."

WEDDING OF MAE CORMODE TO WILLIAM STUTZ.  "The marriage of Miss Mae Cormode and Will Stutz took place this afternoon at 2:30 at the Presbyterian parsonage, the Rev. E. L. Brown officiating.  The bride's sister, Miss Lola Cormode and the groom's brother, Reidel Stutz witnessed the ceremony.  The bride, a decided blonde, looked lovely in a blue crepe dress with a matching hat.  She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Cormode.  Mrs. Stutz graduated at ACCHS six years ago, taught one year at Cain School and attended K. U. a year.  She is a very lovable young woman, well versed in the qualities of homemaking and housekeeping and capable of being queen of her own home.  Her popularity was evidenced by the many showers and parties given in her favor.

"The groom is the son of Mrs. C. W. Stutz.  He comes from one of the most progressive, well to do families of the county.  He is a young man of sterling qualities and is greatly respected by all who know him.

"Mr. and Mrs. Stutz were guests of honor at a supper after the ceremony at the bride's home, when the immediate families of both parties were guests.  After the supper they left for a short trip to Lawrence, Emporia and Centralia where they will visit relatives.  After their return, for the present, they will live at both the Cormode and Stutz home, but later Mr. Stutz will take charge of his mother's farm and they will move to it."  (11-9-28)

STAG PARTY.  "About twenty-five enjoyed a Stag party, Saturday night, given by Wm Cormode and John E. Stutz, at the home of the latter on the Monrovia road.  It was given in honor of Wm Stutz, one of Atchison County's most popular young farmers, whose marriage to Miss Mae Cormode will take place Nov. 8.  The evening was spent playing cards.  At a late hour Mrs. Stutz served refreshments to the guests."

ANOTHER PARTY.  "One of the nicest parties of the season was given last Wednesday afternoon, at the John Cormode home, when Mr. and Mrs. Cormode announced the engagement of their daughter Mae to William Stutz.  Their pretty modern country home had been decorated in Halloween colors, and contests in keeping with the season were enjoyed.  The announcement and the date of the wedding were found under a witches hat.  After the contest the guests hemmed tea towels for the bride-to-be and enjoyed looking over the contents of her hope chest.  Some of the articles were gifts, but most of them were made by Miss Cormode, a matched set of sheets, pillow cases, dresser cover, vanity set, done in white would be the envy of any young housekeeper.

"Those attending from Effingham were Mrs. Paul Murray, Mrs. Ida Murray, Mrs. C. E. Sells and Mrs. Jack Farrel and children.  Other guests were neighbor girls and girl friends from Lancaster.

"A delicious lunch consisting of sandwiches, pickles, doughnuts, pumpkin pie with whipped cream and cocoa was served."

YET ANOTHER PARTY.  "Mrs. John E. Stutz and Miss Elnora Stutz entertained with a miscellaneous shower for Miss Mae Cormode, a popular bride-to-be, at the home of Mrs. Stutz on the Monrovia road, Saturday afternoon.  The afternoon was spent in contests.  Prizes were won by Miss Cormode and Miss Mateel Hoffman.  After contests, two pretty little girls, Wilma Jane Cormode and Katherine Stutz dressed in pink, wearing pink head bands, entered the room pulling a little wagon decorated with pink and filled with presents which they presented to Miss Cormode.  She received many nice presents of glass, china, silver and aluminum ware.  Elaborate refreshments were served."

HONEYMOON TRIP DELAYED.  "Mr. and Mrs. Will Stutz did not get to leave on their honeymoon trip immediately after the ceremony.  While the supper was in progress at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Cormode, boys in the neighborhood took the wheels off of his car, put it up on blocks, sewed up his clothes, etc.  So Mr. and Mrs. Stutz were compelled to spend the night at the Cormode home, where they were given the old fashioned charivari."  (11-16-28)

HISTORY FROM OBITUARY OF WILLIAM GRAHAM.  "William Graham, unpretentious cousin of Andrew Mellon, Secretary of the United States Treasury, died at his home early Saturday morning.  He was 86 years old, one of the last of the pioneer who were eye witnesses to the early history of Kansas.

"His death is the result of a general breakdown.  An illness of a year ago preceded it.

"Today a single store stands at Monrovia, between Atchison and Effingham on the concrete highway.  When William Graham moved to a farm near that community in 1859, Monrovia boasted a 20 room hotel, two saloons, a land office, store and post office.  Mr. Graham owned at the time of his death the farm in the Monrovia neighborhood for which his father paid $800 in gold.

"Mr. Graham was born in Ligonier, Pa., June 18, 1842.  He was of Scottish-Irish descent.  His mother's name was Nancy Mellon; she was an aunt of the famous Andrew.

"Members of the Graham's family had visited the Mellons and have remarked a strong resemblance between the Mellons and the Grahams in most characteristics, but that of accumulating wealth, although Mr. Graham was retired farmer, comfortably fixed.

"During the Civil war, Mr. Graham and his father were employed in the commissary department under his uncle, Captain Robert Graham.

"In 1866, he was married to Miss Ellen McLenon at the Lutheran parsonage at Monrovia, a church and parsonage that his father had helped to build.

"Mrs. Graham is still living and is in fairly good health.

"Six daughters were born to the pair, four of whom survive.  They are Mrs. Anna Carter and Mrs. Lulu Lumpkin, both of Kansas City.  Mrs. Etta McCalla of Garnett, and Mrs. Romayne McFadden of Oklahoma City.

"He is also survived by nine grandchildren and five great grandchildren.

"Funeral services for Mr. Graham were held at the Christian church, with his old time friends and former pastor, Rev. H. B. Baliou in charge.  Pallbearers were A. E. Mayhew, Cliff Hipple, Henry Fankhannel, R. C. Hargrove, J. R. Snyder and Chas Chiles."

 

CLASSIFIED ADS

Plan on attending

The 127th ACCHS Annual Alumni Banquet will be held on June 1st, 2019 in the ACCJ/SHS gymnasium at 6:30 PM.  A fellowship hour will be held prior to the banquet from 5:30 to 6:30 PM in the commons. 

Tickets are on sale till May 28th at the Muscotah Mercantile in Muscotah;  ENB Farmers and Merchants branch and Hegarty-Caplinger Insurance office in Atchison and Effingham.  Tickets are $15.00.  The meal will be prepared by Martha's Catering in Effingham. 

Please contact the USD#377 office at 913-833-5050 to reserve a room at the high school for any class reunions. A tour of the old high school can be arranged if desired by a class holding a reunion.  Contact Steve Caplinger 913-370-0523 to schedule a tour. 

Current officers of the association are: President John Miller, Vice President-Greg Miller, Secretary-Sharman Heineken and Treasurer- Jim Cormode.

Don't forget the ACCHS Alumni Scholarship Foundation holds their annual meeting at the high school at 2 PM June 1st, 2019.  Everyone is welcome to attend.

Please contact the USD # 377 office at 913-833-5050 to reserve a room at the high school for any class reunions.

Current officers are:

President John Miller                                               sonofthunder24@cox.net

Vice-Pres. Greg Miller               941-769-5390    gregmillerdo@gmail.com

Secretary Sharman Heineken        785-872-3120       s_heineken@hotmail.com

Treasurer Jim Cormode                913-803-0029      james.cormode@gmail.com

Mark your calendar and attend if you can.

Questions call 913-370-0523 or

email:  acchsalumniassoc@gmail.com

Class announcements and news are posted at the Alumni web site at www.thenewsleaf.com/acchsalumni.htm.

 If wish to have your class information posted on the website just send the information to:

 acchsalumniassoc@gmail.com.

 

 

"GUESS WHO"

Can you guess who is in our photo below?

 LAST WEEK

Last week's Photo showed the following:

Seated are: Dale Westermann, Virginia Navinskey, Treasurer; Sally Kloepper, Secretary; Larry Smith, President; Melvin Hamon, VP; Margie Buttron, Mr. Cashman, Advisor. Second row: Linda Maris, David Lemke, Jerry Taliaferro, Jerry Handke, Joe Elias, Malcom Gigstad, Charles Tuley, Dick Hays, Nancy Banks.  Third Row:  Connie Mier, Carol Fisher, Wally Hisle, Kent Wheeler, Nick Iles, Bob Falk, Connie Taliaferro, Deanna Shannon.

 

    Problems with this web site contact cap@thenewsleaf.com Last updated 5-21-2019

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